Diabetes Burnout.

Let’s talk about you and me, diabetes.

When we first met I thought, hey, this could work out. I mean I was nervous, of course, but I knew it wasn’t the end of the world. Then we got to really know each other, like, on a very personal level, and I have come to realize that you are such a jerk. You’re very hot and cold. One day you are all, like, hey, we’re friends. Best friends. Then the next day you are dragging me down. Not cool, dude. I decided to give you the benefit of the doubt though and continue this journey with you. However, I suggest you shape up or ship out.

This is your one and only warning, friend.

Sincerely, Elizabeth.

What Is Diabetes Burnout?

Diabetes burnout is common. Burnout is best described as a state where you grow tired of managing your diabetes. Instead of sticking to your scheduled blood sugar checks, meal plan, insulin routine and exercise each day, you only do them partially or possibly neglect them all together for a period of time. You know you should count those carbohydrates and check your blood before eating that bagel with cream cheese…but you just can’t seem to muster the motivation.

Have you ever felt this way about your diabetes?

I know I have. This isn’t the first time, and to be quite honest, it probably wont be the last time. My first thoughts in the morning are diabetes. In between the different things I have to do in a day there it is glaring at me. Before I can shut my eyes for the night I have to think about it. It’s exhausting. Normally I am fine. I do what I have to do and then I move on, however, this time around I am feeling so blah about everything.

This week my sugars have been happy. So that’s great. Last week was not so good. I think what I need is an attitude adjustment, I need to get back to working out because that helped my mood quite a bit. More importantly I need to keep moving forward. No point in looking back and being bummed out.

Just keep swimming, right?

What do you do when this happens? How do you get out of the funk?

 

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7 Comments

  1. It’s been a long time since I’ve had true diabetes burnout. I mean, I have the off day every now and then, but nothing like the I-hate-this-screw-diabetes-I’ll-eat-what-I-want times I used to have before I got married. Being single with diabetes felt very alone, and it was easier then to sink into depression. My heart goes out to anyone who has diabetes and does not have a good support structure of loved ones around them – that is literally the only thing that keeps me out of funks now.

  2. I’ve recently just come out of a burnout…I’m 19 and it’s my first one…however it did last for a LONG time…
    I just seemed to get bored of it and tried to push it into the background by ignoring it. After this long period of time I found I was bored of it being bad, and constantly being high.
    Like you say, I imagine it will happen again however I hope I will get out of it quicker than this one!

    • I was diagnosed at 18 so my first feeling of burnout was around the same age. I was 19, starting to live on my own, doing what young adults do. Feeling like diabetes was such a hassle. It lasted quite awhile for me too. These days i wont say that it doesn’t happen every once in a while. Just not as hardcore as it used to. There is a lot that we have to deal with on a day to day basis and it gets frustrating. What makes us stand out from the crowd is our willingness to keep going. You’re funks wont last long just remember that you aren’t alone. We’re all in this together. Supporting and encouraging one another. You can always email me too if you ever just want to talk. :) elizabeth.r.fritz@gmail.com.

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